HOME   ARCHIVE   GALLERY   SHOP   ABOUT US      
 

 
SALFORD KIDS KNOW NOTHING OF MEDIACITYUK
 

Star date: 28th June 2010

What Is MediaCityUK?
"Is it something to do with football?"

Young people in Salford who are supposed to benefit from MediaCityUK don't even know what it is or where it is, according to research carried out less than a few miles from the Salford Quays site.

Far from being inspired by the £1billion+ scheme that's promising jobs and opportunities for local people, the vast majority of young people, aged nine to fifteen, who were asked a series of questions about MediaCityUK had no idea of the concept.

Full story here…


MEDIACITYUK KIDS
click image to enlarge

What Do You Think You Can Do At MediaCityUK?
"It's for people who have had a bad time in their lives"

Is it a club? A swimming pool? A football pitch? Young people who are supposed to benefit from the BBC move from London to Salford and the resulting creative industries, know virtually nothing about the MediaCityUK development, according to a feature in the second issue of Salford Media Scene.

The young people, from Albert's youth club based in Albert Park in Broughton, interviewed each other about their hopes and aspirations for the £1billion project which has promised to include Salford's community. Most didn't even know what it was.

Here's a selection of the Questions and Answers.

What Is MediaCityUK?

`Is it something to do with music?'
`Football?'
`Is it something to do with the City of Salford?'
`Don't know'

Where Do You Think It Is?

`Salford 7'
`Albert Park'
`In town' (Manchester)
`Don't know'

What Do You Think You Do At MediaCityUK?

`Drink beer and smoke'
`Is it like a great big swimming pool?'
`It's for people who have had a bad time in their lives'
`Is it a club?'
`Singing and stuff'
`Play'
`Don't know'

Will MediaCityUK Be Good For People Around Here?

`Possibly, if I knew what it was'
`I haven't got a clue'
`Yes – 'cos there's nothing else around here – all there is to do is to go to McDonalds or the park'
`Don't know what it is so don't know'

Only one of the 16 young people asked knew exactly what MediaCityUK was, where it was and what will go on there.

The full story is in Salford Media Scene issue 2, available from The Langworthy Cornerstone, Liverpool Street or on PDF – click here or scroll down on front page of www.salfordstar.com and click on the cover (6mb)


 

David Henry wrote
at 06:20:17 on 04 July 2010
Hopefully this will eventually change if the BBC keep their promise of moving CBBC (along with the Blue Peter Garden) to MediaCity.
 
Alan Mcglone wrote
at 09:22:51 on 02 July 2010
Young Salfordians lack of awareness of Media City is stunning and disappointing but understandable. Most older people don't know much about Medi City either. If they aren't involved, informed or engaged by the organisations responsible for this massive public and private investment, why should anybody think this fantastic new project is relevant to them? Theres still a big public information and engagement job to be done.
 
David Henry wrote
at 17:41:15 on 30 June 2010
Your stats are completely irrelevant @Henry Hound since the vast majority of young people who attend Albert Park Youth Club (and who are involved with the Youth Service are 15+. Even if the survey here only interviewed a small sample of people it was "qualitative" and represents only s small cross-section of people. As a Youth Worker for many years in the area in question and someone who grew up around here I would concur with the results. It's a shame you seem so determined to ridicule the Salford Star's content rather than provide any contribution of substance.
 
Salford freak wrote
at 17:24:22 on 29 June 2010
Hi Steve, The first thing that I want to say is that I'm always a little concerned about posting on here, because I'd like to see the site turned more into a debating arena. At the minute, I think people who disagree with you come on here just to antagonise others - eg Henry Hound's comment. But I also think that it is often difficult to debate issues like this because of the strength of feeling that people have about it. MediaCity is such an odd conundrum. On the one hand, as an (honorary) Salfordian, I'm chuffed to bits to see development and jobs for the city. The economy will benefit, schools, jobs, environment. So overall, I'm supportive. But the issue is how to ensure that the benefits aren't channelled into fat cats' pockets, leaving behind the people in Salford (and beyond) that really need the jobs. How? I don't know. I'm sure there's far more educated people than me currently scratching their heads over this one. Perhaps one way is to 'inspire' children that this is for them and not for some plummy voiced living-off-daddy's-trust-fund jerk-offs from the Home Counties. To encourage youngsters to take 'ownership' of it. I know that sounds cheesey, but I think it could work. Not that I know anything. The one thing I am concerned about, however, is making sure that we don't see this as 'exclusively for Salfordians and no-one else'. I speak here as an honorary Salfordian, one who isn't from this part of the world but who has settled down quite nicely here and would never ever move. Salford is my home, has been for many many years. I've fallen in love with the city, its culture, its people and the decades I've been here have been the best of my life. But. We mustn't fall into the trap of making barriers. In my world, socialism has no barriers. I believe in opportunities for everyone who needs them. I don't believe that a young 18-year-old from Wigan, who has worked hard and got qualifications for MediaCity, should be cast aside in favour of an 18-year-old from Salford who has dossed around for two years with no qualifications. In my head, I know which youngster should get the job - it should be on merit, not on location. Maybe that's just me, and I don't want people to shout at me for that. I want to debate the point, not get shot down because folk don't agree with me. Finally, I can just see the Guardian, or one of those other patronising London rags, when MediaCity finally opens up. However well-intentioned, I cringe when I think of how condescending it will be. 'Oh look at the BBC giving all those jobs to those poor deserving Salford folk. They've got nothing and yet the BBC are giving them a helping hand on the ladder, blah blah blah.' I hated Tony Blair for taking the Labour party so far to the right, but the one thing I did agree with him on was a meritocracy. I genuinely believe that these decisions should be taken on merit, not on what your daddy earns. Though I also see the problem that the world is inherently skewed towards those with more, so it's a difficult conundrum. Broadly speaking I think the Salford Star is right to be sceptical about MediaCity's impact on local people. Which is why we need to DO something about it. I'd be interested to hear thoughts on what.
 
Matt V wrote
at 17:21:56 on 29 June 2010
Yes, I realise it wasn't a Salford Star article - I was referring to the original article in Salford Media Scene. I'd have been interested to see if, when asked what MediaCityUK was and replying "no", these kids knew of the development on The Quays and who was moving in there - I bet the response would have been more favourable then. THAT is why I think the original survey is biased. What about the kids who are getting a new school built just up the road? That's tied to MediaCityUK - do they know what it's called? Maybe not, but I bet they're aware of the development.
 
Henry Hound wrote
at 17:21:26 on 29 June 2010
Just because the Council might use non-representative samples that doesn't mean that Salford Media Scene should stoop to their level (nor the Star in reprinting elements of the article). There are clearly issues around awareness of the MediaCityUK branding which need addressing but the headline is rather sensational once the content of the piece is looked at objectively.
 
Salford Star wrote
at 14:01:03 on 29 June 2010
see comments below... Two things - first of all it wasn't a Salford Star article, second the kids interviewed each other about MediaCityUK, so to say the article was `written to prove a point already decided on' is pathetic, quite frankly. And the other point about only taking a small sample is equally tepid. You just watch the Council, or whoever, get a couple of kids from Salford who have got jobs at MediaCity and hold them up to show the world how Salford is benefitting from the £500million+ public investment. For us, the point of the story was that all sorts of spurious organisations are getting millions (yes millions) of pounds to `involve the community' in MediaCityUK, yet local kids don't even know what it is. Maybe that's because a lot of these organisations aren't from Salford and don't know how to engage anybody, apart from their wallets.
 
Matt V wrote
at 13:49:39 on 29 June 2010
Well, I'm not being funny, but MediaCityUK is just a brand name isn't it? A brand name for a set of buildings. I bet if you asked the same age group in Trafford in 1997 what The Trafford Centre was they wouldn't have known, but they'd have known about "the big new shopping centre". It seems to me that this article has been written to prove a point they'd already decided on, and that it really only carries the most vague and, frankly, uninspiring of points.
 
Henry Hound wrote
at 09:48:34 on 29 June 2010
There are over 17,000 children & young people in Salford aged 9 to 15 - this article samples 16 of them (less than 0.1%) from just one part of the city and decides "Salford children know nothing of MediaCityUK" - no wonder the Star struggles to attract council funding when it tries to sensationalise non-stories like this one.
 
jacqui Carroll wrote
at 17:15:19 on 28 June 2010
This is shocking, everyone has been talking about what its going to do for Salford young people - we need to find out why they dont know and get them involved now - as it their parents money thats paying for it and will continue to pay for it - get the kids involved now/
 
Please enter your comment below:
 
 
 
Salford Star CD
Salford Star contact
Deli Lama
advertisement
 
Contact us
phone: 07957 982960
Facebook       Twitter
 
 
Recent comments
article: ARTISTS TAKE UP RESIDENCE IN CONTROVERSIAL URBAN SPLASH SALFORD DEVELOPMENT
Have I missed something? is it April 1st and I have got the wrong calendar out. The story borders sadly on farce what next. ... [more]
article: SALFORD STAR EDITOR NAMED IN NCTJ LIST OF MOST RESPECTED JOURNALISTS IN UK
you have to love the hypocrisy of the left.You have nothing positive to say about capitalism, but want others to put their hands i... [more]
article: ARTISTS TAKE UP RESIDENCE IN CONTROVERSIAL URBAN SPLASH SALFORD DEVELOPMENT
I remember reading an interview several years ago with Tom Bloxham of Urban Splash, or as it's called in our house Mundane Splodge... [more]
article: ARTISTS TAKE UP RESIDENCE IN CONTROVERSIAL URBAN SPLASH SALFORD DEVELOPMENT
What next?Words fail me.... [more]
article: HUGE INTERNATIONAL FILIA WOMEN’S CONFERENCE COMES TO ECCLES
The women who made seat covers at Ford were not the only ones who got shit on. I was once maintainance electrician doing work wher... [more]
 
 
 
 
 
Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds
 
 
 

Donate

Help the Salford Star...

all donations welcome

 
 

More articles...

ARTISTS TAKE UP RESIDENCE IN CONTROVERSIAL URBAN SPLASH SALFORD DEVELOPMENT

Star date: 15th October 2018

ARTISTS TO CHALLENGE HOUSING POLICIES WHILE LIVING IN LUXURY HOUSE

'You can't even stop your car to take in the breathtaking sterilization of the place...'

Last week, artists moved into a stunning Urban Splash house in the new Springfield Lane development as part of a year-long project called Tenancy in which they will explore 'what it's like to live in a city negotiating rapid change' and 'who is benefitting'.

The Springfield Lane development, being branded as in 'Manchester', has no affordable housing and avoided hundreds of thousands of pounds in planning fees. Can the artist project, actually sponsored by Tom Bloxham and Urban Splash, make a difference?

Full details here...

HUGE INTERNATIONAL FILIA WOMEN’S CONFERENCE COMES TO ECCLES

Star date: 14th October 2018

SALFORD STREET SUPPORT TO TALK AT LARGEST UK WOMEN'S RIGHTS CONFERENCE

FiLia 2018 Conference
Saturday and Sunday 20th and 21st October
The Lighthouse, Eccles

The massive FiLiA international conference is to take place in Eccles next weekend, with women flying in from all over the world, including from Argentina and Palestine.

There's over two dozen sessions covering all feminist-related subjects, and from Salford, Angela Barratt of Salford and Manchester Street Support will be speaking on women and poverty, while Salford University lecturer, Suryia Nayak, will be giving an Introduction To Consciousness Raising.

Full details here...

COUNTESS WHO MURDERED 650 WOMEN ARRIVES AT EAGLE INN SALFORD

Star date: 14th October 2018

HUNGARIAN GOTHIC DRAMA BASED ON TRUE STORY OF MURDER AND VANITY

Countess
Monday 29th October 7pm and Tuesday 30th October 4pm and 7pm
Eagle Inn £10/£8

A truly gothic production of Countess arrives at the Eagle Inn on 29th and 30th October, based on the true story of Hungarian aristocrat, Elizabeth Bathory, who murdered 650 women for the sake of her vanity. This aims to get inside of her mind with a supernatural twist.

Full details here...

SALFORD WINTER WONDERLAND COMMUNITY COSTUME MAKING DAY

Star date: 14th October 2018

WOODY, BUZZ AND CHASE AT BROUGHTON CRICKET CLUB

Creating Carnival
Saturday 20th October 12noon-4pm free
Broughton Cricket and Rugby Club

Next Saturday, 20th October, Toy Story characters Buzz Lightyear and Woody, plus Paw Patrol's Chase and Santa and Mrs Claus will be at Broughton Cricket and Rugby Club as part of a free Salford Winter Wonderland community day, making costumes and props for a massive event and carnival parade happening at the end of November. It's free and everyone is welcome to attend.

Full details here...

GILL’S SALFORD WALK FOR DEMENTIA SET TO RAISE HUNDREDS OF POUNDS

Star date: 13th October 2018

WALK FOR DEMENTIA AND SALFORD SURVIVOR PROJECT

This evening, almost two dozen people set off on a very special sponsored walk around Agecroft Cemetery to raise money for the Pendleton Court Dementia Ward and the Salford Survivor Project which helps those subjected to domestic violence and abuse.

The walk was in memory of Niki Campbell, who was murdered by her ex-boyfriend last year, and her mum, Jayne, joined the event which is set to raise hundreds of pounds for the excellent causes.

Full details here...

 



written and produced by Salfordians for Salfordians
with attitude and love xxx