HOME   ARCHIVE   GALLERY   SHOP   ABOUT US      
 

 
SALFORD HEALTH DIVIDE AS LORDS VOTE ON NHS FUTURE
 

Star date: 24th April 2013

NHS PRIVATISATION WILL MAGNIFY SALFORD HEALTH DIVIDE

Today the House of Lords is voting on Section 75 of the Health and Social Care Act which, in effect, opens up the privatisation of the NHS. Campaigners say that it will create a health service that benefits those who can afford to pay.

In Salford the geographical health and wealth divide is almost the same. If you live in Worsley and Boothstown you're a health winner. Central Salford or Winton? You're a health loser.

For more details on the NHS vote and the Salford health divide click here…


Ripping The Heart Out Of The NHS Ripping The Heart Out Of The NHS Ripping The Heart Out Of The NHS
Female Life Expectancy Salford Male Life Expectancy Salford
click image to enlarge

Today the House of Lords is debating regulations under Section 75 of the Health and Social Care Act which deal with 'procurement, patient choice and competition', to open up the NHS to private companies.

"The new Regulations…show clearly that this Government is determined to break up the NHS system that has delivered high quality healthcare at low cost for the last 65 years" says Lucy Reynolds, health policy analyst at the University of London

"Despite clear public support for the NHS, we are being forced down the road to a US system, which places heavy financial burdens on patients, produces worse results than single payer' systems and doesn't even save the taxpayer money" she adds "It is frightening to watch this happen without effective media scrutiny and without the public being properly informed."

The Regulations, if approved, will have a huge impact on Salford because the wealth divide and the health divide are almost geographically the same in the city.

For instance, Salford's latest Public Health Annual Report, which covers the year 2011-12, shows that, if you are female and live in Broughton or Winton your life expectancy is between 72.9 and 76.6 years. If you are a female who lives in Boothstown and Ellenbrook you can expect to live between 83.7 and 85.1 years. That's well over ten years longer.

If you're a male living in Broughton, Langworthy, Irwell Riverside or Barton your life expectancy is between 67.5 and 72.1 years. If you're a male living in Worsley you can expect to live between 80.1 and 81.2 years. That's also well over ten years longer.

Campaigners say that if these Regulations go through, instead of benefitting the people who most need the NHS, health services will be geared to those who can afford it – making the health divide in Salford even worse.

"If these Regulations are passed into law, the NHS as we know it will be in grave danger" says Professor Wendy Savage of Keep Our NHS Public "The regulations will put our health service under European competition rules, and it will be almost impossible for commissioning groups to avoid offering `business opportunities' to private companies.

"And there will not be a `managed market', where politicians, hospitals and healthcare professionals can make strategic choices about their priorities" she adds "Rather it will be a US-style market in health. And the impact of austerity policies will make it a two-tier service. There will be a first class service for those who can afford to pay for private health insurance, and at best a basic service, narrowed in the scope of what is offered, for the rest of us."


SOME SALFORD HEALTH STATISTICS*

• While death rates in Salford have been falling since 2009, in line with the North West and England, they are still way above the average for the North West and England.

• Death rates for females in Salford have been rising since 2010, while the rates for England and the North West have been falling.

• Death rates for males in Salford are falling but are still above the average for the North West and England.

• Male deaths from cancer and cardiovascular diseases have been falling but mental and behavioural related deaths are rising.

• Female deaths from cardiovascular diseases and respiratory diseases are falling but deaths from cancer and mental and behavioural related issues are rising. The latter, quite dramatically.

• In Salford the number of new cases of cancer is the second highest in the country. There are 1,200 new cases each year and 600 deaths due to cancer.

• Cancer death rates for under 75 year olds across Greater Manchester show that, in 2009, Salford had the second highest death rate for males, and the highest death rate for females.

• While new cases of HIV are falling, Salford has the fourth highest number of people living with HIV outside London.

• In 2010/11 Salford had the highest number of admissions to hospital for alcohol-related reasons. Salford also has one of the highest rates of liver disease in the country.

• Around 36,500 adults and 6,000 children living in Salford are experiencing poor mental wellbeing. 11,800 adults of working age are likely to have depression, learning problems, mental problems and nervous disorders.

* Statistics taken from Salford Public Health Annual Report 2011-12.
 
See also previous Salford Star article Ripping The Heart Out of the NHS Protest MediaCityUK – click here

Bernard Brough wrote
at 18:39:44 on 26 April 2013
I would point out the disaster that privatisation has been. Astronomic utility bills, a public transport system that would be hilarious were it not so serious. Privatisation is bad, very, very bad.
 
Winston Smnith wrote
at 16:18:32 on 26 April 2013
@Not a Tory, you can't compare private and public health costs at such a superficial level. The private sector will cherry pick the 'best' patients whereas the NHS must treat EVERYONE including extremely complex, long term cases, from the moment they arrive, for as long as it takes. E.g. someone with a history of cancer and with compounding problems such as mental health issues, alcoholism, obesity, old age, etc, will HAVE to be treated, ALWAYS, by the NHS, sometimes literally costing £millions for individual patients. The private sector's solution to this is, basically, to tell them to fuck off.
 
White wrote
at 15:05:34 on 25 April 2013
My experience of NHS v private [Oaklands Hospital - Lancaster Rd] I have numerous visits to Oaklands for various non-urgent procedures and operations and found the treatment and care quite excellent. As all my visits were not urgent it was always a case of “when would you like to come in?” I have also had a recent NHS experience of an urgent nature. A visit to my GP resulted in an appointment with a consultant at SRI two days later. There was a suspicion of cancer so everything worked at top speed, equal if not quicker than anything in the private sector. The tests at SRI proved negative, including the last which was a scan. Within two hours of the scan I was phoned with the negative result and the news that something else had been detected so I was being referred to MRI. At 8-00 the same evening consultant surgeons at MRI phone with instructions to report there as soon as possible the next day. This resulted in an early evening operation of the next day - a Saturday, followed by a long stay in hospital where the treatment was excellent, and I was seen by a whole range of different ‘departments’, pain relief, physiotherapy, dietary etc. I am pretty sure from this experience, and from a couple of friends who have undergone equally serious surgery, that for emergencies and for very serious problems, the NHS is second to none and its services must not be diluted or privatised. For elective, none urgent procedures the private sector can provide a service.
 
Paul Gerrard wrote
at 12:33:40 on 25 April 2013
@No not a Tory. My experience on Lancaster Road was very different. I was referred for a scan from my GP and to my surprise was sent to the private Oaklands on Lancaster Road. It's clean and smart but very cramped, no separate changing room, no nurse in attendance, male scanner operator, change clothes in the scanner room itself, if I had been female I might well have felt awkward. It felt like a hole-in-the-corner effort operating on a shoestring (no criticism of the operator, who of course told me he had been trained at MRI, private hospitals don't actually train staff, they just nick them from the NHS, one less cost to worry about). I can't understand why this hospital, in the shadow of SRI, is needed. And why can't SRI afford the scanner used on me?
 
No not a tory, life long Labour actually wrote
at 20:16:41 on 24 April 2013
I hope the vast majority of NHS services can be provided by the private sector in the near future, I know of loads of people who have been sent to the private hospital on Lancaster road by the NHS. The treatment they have received has been top notch treated like royalty in most cases, all the treatment was funded by the NHS and several people were told by the surgeons (that also work for the NHS) that the private treatment cost the NHS a lot less. The recovery times are quicker according to statistics and the waiting time is less, efficiency is the order of the day it seems. I really do think this is the way forward, NHS pay-private do the work, better and cheaper. Keep A&E in the NHS but all routine surgery contract it out.
 
Michael Felse wrote
at 17:50:30 on 24 April 2013
The underlining facts in this alarming report go to prove Salford must do more to improve the health and well-being of people living in the City, across the age range. I urge our elected Mayor to place as his priority a City Wide health and social care plan that is based on improvement statistics, putting people's health before politics and ensuring as the new rules bite all the charities and organisations in the City best able to deal with the situations are given the full support of all our elected Councillors.
 
Please enter your comment below:
 
 
 
Salford Star Hoodies
Salford Star contact
Deli Lama
advertisement
 
Contact us
phone: 07957 982960
Facebook       Twitter
 
 
Recent comments
article: PETITION AND PROTEST PLANNED OVER SALFORD SCHOOL HEAD TEACHER SUSPENSION
I seriously doubt he's earned 1.5 million. If he has, it would probably explain the suspension! Probably the TV exposure has gone... [more]
article: PETITION AND PROTEST PLANNED OVER SALFORD SCHOOL HEAD TEACHER SUSPENSION
My daughter recently left and my son still attends the work drew povey and team harrop do with and for these kids you cant put int... [more]
article: SALFORD PEOPLE TO JUDGE WHETHER PLANNING COUNCILLOR BROKE RULES
Bob, those that want to buy the proposed flats would be aware of what they are buying, including the parking arrangements. If they... [more]
article: SALFORD PEOPLE TO JUDGE WHETHER PLANNING COUNCILLOR BROKE RULES
To wrote at 06.39, you clearly haven't understood my comment. Yes Salix can borrow the money, which would have to be paid back, as... [more]
article: A YEAR AFTER SALFORD CLADDING SCANDAL INDEPENDENT TENANTS MEETING TO BE HELD
I remember when you had to have an interview to get in Thorn Court.A friend of mine who lives there now says the block is on the w... [more]
 
 
 
 
 
Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds
 
 
 

Donate

Help the Salford Star...

all donations welcome

 
 

More articles...

SALFORD TOWERBLOCK CLADDING RESIDENTS UNITE TO TACKLE PENDLETON TOGETHER

Star date: 18th July 2018

SPRUCE COURT AND THORN COURT TENANTS GET ORGANISED TO FIGHT BACK

"We're sick to death of being treated like dirt..."

Last night, tenants from Spruce Court and Thorn Court met to share concerns over dangerous cladding, fire safety, security and other issues, as they united to take on towerblock manager Pendleton Together and Salford City Council, which owns the blocks.

"They try to ignore what we're saying" insisted one tenant "They're complacent... we're sick to death of being treated like dirt...".

Full details here...

SALFORD QUAYS DEVELOPER TO AVOID £1MILLION PAYMENT WHILE NO AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROVIDED

Star date: 17th July 2018

FURNESS QUAY DEVELOPER PROVIDES NO AFFORDABLE HOUSING ON HUGE APARTMENT SCHEME

Salford's planning scandal is to go up another gear this week when an application by developer De Trafford for 421 apartments in blocks up to 27 storeys high on the site of Furness Quay is considered by councillors. Thanks to Salford City Council policies, the developer will be providing no affordable properties, while, through 'viability' assessments it is set to avoid over £1million in planning fees.

Meanwhile, the English Cities Fund (ECf) is continuing its secrecy in relation to new apartments and an office development around Chapel Street and New Bailey.

Full details here...

A YEAR AFTER SALFORD CLADDING SCANDAL INDEPENDENT TENANTS MEETING TO BE HELD

Star date: 16th July 2018

CLADDING, SECURITY, FIRE SAFETY AND MORE TO BE DISCUSSED AT PENDLEON TENANTS MEETING

As the Grenfell Tower victims said, before the tragic fire their warnings were not listened to by the authorities. Now tenants in Spruce Court, Pendleton, who are still living with the dangerous cladding, have called an independent meeting for tomorrow, Tuesday, 17th July, to discuss cladding, security and more, while Thorn Court residents are also complaining about the same issues.

Full details here...

PETITION AND PROTEST PLANNED OVER SALFORD SCHOOL HEAD TEACHER SUSPENSION

Star date: 15th July 2018

SCHOOL PROTEST PLANNED OVER HARROP FOLD HEAD AND STAFF SUSPENSION

After Salford City Council suspended Harrop Fold School Head, Drew Povey, and three other staff members last week, supporters have launched a petition to reinstate them, while pupils and parents are planning a protest at the school this Thursday.

Full details here...

FANGIRL CELEBRATION OF SUPER-FANS COMES TO SALFORD FOR GM FRINGE

Star date: 15th July 2018

FOR THOSE WHO GO THE EXTRA MILE IN PURSUIT OF AN ICON

Fangirl by Quina Chapman
Thursday 19th and Friday 20th July
Kings Arms 7pm £6

Do you go the extra mile in pursuit of an icon? Fangirl, at the Kings Arms this Thursday and Friday, deconstructs the 'condition' through songs, rhymes and laughs. A Greater Manchester Fringe must-see, enthuses Ian Leslie.

Full details here...

 



written and produced by Salfordians for Salfordians
with attitude and love xxx